Monday, Aug 21st

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Opinion

The Curious Case of Dr. Anna Pou: Hell and High Water

katrinadrNew Orleans is known for its sizzling jazz clubs, world-class restaurants and winning sports teams. But in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina in the summer of 2005, the Big Easy became the site of a mass murder at the hands of a doctor who "involuntarily euthanized" dozens of patients, most of whom were black.

How did this happen, and why hasn't there been justice for the victims?

The picturesque city of New Orleans sits in a bowl, eight to 12 feet below sea level in some places, with Lake Pontchartrain to the north and Lake Borgne to the east and buoyed by a levee system that had seen better days. When Katrina pummeled southeast Louisiana on Monday, August 29, 2005, those levees breached in 50 places, causing severe flooding in 80...

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Turning the Tables: Diversity in the New Media Age

http_redCharles Whitaker, professor at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism believes the magazine publishing industry still only plays lip service when dealing with the lack of diversity within the profession.

Despite years of knocking on the doors of major US publishing houses, Whittaker, an adviser on issues of diversity to the Magazine Publishers of America, believes the root of the problem lies in the lack of multiculturalism behind the scenes in the magazine publishing...

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What Happened to Big Mama?

Black_grandmother_and_children2If you haven't been living under a rock these days you've witnessed a paradigm shift in the cultural concept of what a grandparent used to be.

Culturally worldwide, grandparents, grandmothers in particular, use to fit a certain archtype: benevolent, prideful and most of all, full of advice so wise and valuable that you could trust it blindfolded. But increasingly, especially as we watch the news these days, we see a character that is alien to our familial sensibilities in every way.

Last...

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